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Roasted Fingerling Potatoes with Chive Pesto

Roasted Fingerling Potatoes with Chive Pesto


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This vibrant sauce makes good use of an over abundance of chives. It's an ideal accompaniment to classic roasted potatoes.

Ingredients

  • 1¾ pounds fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise
  • 1 tablespoons plus ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • ½ cup (packed) chopped fresh chives, plus more for garnish
  • ½ cup (packed) chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 2 tablespoons slivered almonds, chopped walnuts, or pine nuts
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 425°. In a medium bowl, toss potatoes with 1 Tbsp. oil to coat; season generously with salt and pepper. Spread potato halves in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Roast potatoes, turning occasionally, until tender and golden brown, 25-30 minutes.

  • Meanwhile, combine ½ cup chives, parsley, almonds, and garlic in a processor. Pulse until finely chopped. With machine running, gradually add remaining oil through feed tube and process until incorporated. Transfer chive pesto to a small bowl. Stir in lemon juice, then 2 Tbsp. water. Season pesto with salt and pepper.

  • Transfer potatoes to a platter. Drizzle with half of pesto; sprinkle with additional chopped chives. Serve with remaining pesto.

Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen,

Nutritional Content

One serving contains: Calories (Kcal) 355.6 %Calories From Fat 57.2 Fat (G) 22.6 Saturated Fat (G) 3.0 Cholesterol (Mg) 0 Carbohydrates (G) 35.0 Dietary Fiber (G) 3.8 Total Sugars (G) 0.2 Net Carbs (G) 31.2 Protein (G) 4.3 Sodium (Mg) 13.7Reviews Section

The pesto is equally delicious on pasta or brushed on grilled chicken.

This vibrant sauce makes good use of an over abundance of chives. It's an ideal accompaniment to classic roasted potatoes.

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Chive Pesto

(Updated with video in 2020.)YESTERDAY, I took some freshly-cut chives, and processed them together with garlic, almonds, Parmesan cheese and a little olive oil. The result? Well, let’s just say that after one bite, my eyes rolled to the back of my head. After two bites, I knew I’d have to share the recipe with you:

To watch me make Chive Pesto in real time, just click the “play” arrow above.

Chive Pesto
Ingredients for 1 1/2 cups of sauce
4 cups (or more) chopped fresh “common” (not “garlic”) chives
2 oz. slivered almonds
1 cup freshly-grated Parmesan cheese
1 garlic clove, roughly chopped
1/4 cup (or more) olive oil

For the very best chives, head out to the garden with scissors or hand-pruners, and give your chives a hair-cut. Don’t worry — the plant will re-grow itself in no time at all.

Don’t have a clump of chives in your garden? Then you must plant one. Right away. Not only is this herb perfect for pesto, but its flowers are necessary for this irresistible elixir.

Don’t have a garden? You can obtain already-cut stems from your local farm-stand or supermarket.

To start, roughly chop the herbs. You’ll need at least 4 cups of chives for this recipe.

Then pour the chives into the work bowl of your food processor.

Add 2 ounces of slivered almonds. (Most supermarkets sell 2-oz packages of slivered almonds.)

Also add one cup of freshly-grated Parmesan cheese.

That’s Lily, my sous-chef. To date, she’s the only beagle to have earned a certificate from the Cordon Bleu in Paris. The certificate was for eating, not cooking. Her specialty is Chicken with 40 Cloves of Garlic.

Back to the pesto: Roughly chop one clove of garlic, and add it to the food processor.

Turn the machine on, and give these ingredients a quick spin just to chop them finely.

With the machine running, add olive oil to desired consistency. I used only one 1/4 cup oil, because I wanted a thick, spread-able pesto. If you want a thin pesto that you can toss with your pasta or cooked veggies, by all means add up to one 1/2 cup of oil.

Now taste the sauce. Does it need extra cheese, extra almonds (for crunch), or, perchance, extra chives? Add more of these ingredients to suit your taste.

I would not, however, add any salt. Speaking from experience, the Parmesan cheese offers all the sodium this poetry requires.

Need a few serving ideas? I can offer these:

Chive Pesto is terrific for dipping. I have every intention of serving the sauce on Saturday, when friends David, Robert, Charlotte and Miranda come for dinner. We’ll enjoy the pesto during the cocktail hour, along with crackers and martinis.

You won’t believe what Chive Pesto will do for a piece of steamed cod. I’d say it’s a marriage made in heaven.

It’s also marvelous on hot, cooked pasta, such as the linguine pictured above.

For a quick snack, simply spread thin slices of French baguette with Chive Pesto. The slices pictured above are heading over to Brenda Johnson, my taste-tester. I’d hate for her to miss out on this deliciousness.

Of course, I don’t want you to miss out on the pleasures of Chive Pesto, either. In the comments field below, let me know if you might make this magic sometime soon. As always, I love hearing from you.


Roasted Fingerling Potatoes

Fingerling potatoes are my favorite kind of potatoes. They usually make their appearance in the middle of March and stay around pretty much all summer. These elongated potatoes are naturally knobbly and finger-like in shape. Popular varieties include Russian Banana, French, Rose Finn Apple, and Purple Peruvian. They are fully mature when harvested and should not be confused with new potatoes which are freshly harvested young or small potatoes.

Fingerling potatoes are creamy and buttery with a slightly waxy and firm flesh. They can be roasted or boiled as a side dish to be served with grilled meats, poultry, and fish. Since they are so flavorful, there is little need to add a ton of other ingredients to them. They also take a shorter time to cook as compared to regular potatoes.


I buy fingerlings throughout the summer and served them as a Potato Salad or simply roasted with salt, pepper, dried thyme, and olive oil. I usually cook them on the stove or in the oven while Ro-Ri San cooks the meat on the grill outside.


Oven Roasted Rosemary Garlic Fingerling Potatoes


I started making oven roasted vegetables a few years ago and completely fell in love with the flavor. The caramelization that occurs during slow roasting bringing out the sugars in the vegetables is incredible. But, I had never made potatoes that way, until.

Last year we grilled ribeye steaks and I decided nothing would go better than oven roasted fingerling potatoes. I seasoned them with garlic and rosemary, they were like candy. Chad (my picky husband) and I were head over heals in love.

Needless to say, I have been making them this way ever since. Costco always has a lovely bag of fingerling potatoes and fresh cleaned corn on the cob. Grab both and pop them in the oven together. Click on the corn pic below to see the oven roasted corn recipe. They go perfect with everything. Trust me, you are going to love them.


La Ratte, also known as Asparge potato or La Reine du Touquet. Even though they’re Danish, their legacy is definitely French as Rattes are the chef’s choice for famous French dishes and rich potato purees. Equally they are delicious as salad potatoes or in casseroles and stews, as they keep their shape in cooking. They have a pale cream skin and flesh and a slightly hazelnutty flavour.


Roasted Fingerling Potatoes with Chive Pesto - Recipes

The first Thanksgiving I spent as a vegetarian, I was eleven, and my family wasn’t really sure how handle it. I got a lot of “Oh c’mon, it’s just one day eat some turkey!”. When I announced I was vegan a few years later, their hesitation only got worse. That year, my plate consisted of dry mashed potatoes (literally just mashed up potatoes) and dry dinner rolls. Can anyone say white carbs?!

Over the years, my vegetarian aunt and I have spent a lot of time trying to convince our meat-and-potatoes family that veg food isn’t gross and boring, and they’ve come a long way. I’m happy to say that my more recent Thanksgivings have been much more satisfying and interesting (and to-date have been Tofurkey-less). There are so many traditional Thanksgiving recipes that already are or can easily be made vegetarian or vegan with a little tweaking, and so many more new ones that should be introduced to everyone’s Thanksgiving table.

Here are some of my favorites:

You’d never guess how well tempeh, acorn squash and pomegranate seeds go together until you try this recipe. And it’s so pretty too!

Sweet potato casserole has always been my favorite Thanksgiving food, thanks to my raging sweet tooth. As much as I love my mom’s recipe, this recipe from Meal Makeover Moms is my new favorite because it’s still flavorful and sweet, but you won’t finish dinner feeling like you already ate dessert!

Thanksgiving and brussels sprouts just go together for me. The toasted breadcrumbs and parmesan make this recipe crowd-pleasing for both brussels sprout lovers and skeptics.

Classic already vegetarian food that everyone will love, and the chive pesto sauce is a delicious, unique addition.

My grandma makes the best stuffing. I was so excited to show up to her house one Thanksgiving to see she had made a separate batch for me with all vegan ingredients. A whole pan of stuffing just for me… what more could a girl want? I got her permission to share the recipe with you all!

P.S. When she sent me the recipe, she noted that she usually doesn’t measure anything, but you can use your discretion on that!

With a lemon tahini dressing, this salad is so refreshing amidst a table full of rich Thanksgiving foods.

While I now float somewhere in-between vegan and vegetarian, I still try to bake vegan whenever I can (especially when it’s so easy!). This recipe is my go-to for pumpkin pie, and no one will have any idea it’s dairy-free.

The first Thanksgiving I spent as a vegetarian, I was eleven, and my family wasn’t really sure how handle it. I got a lot of “Oh c’mon, it’s just one day eat some turkey!”. When I announced I was vegan a few years later, their hesitation only got worse. That year, my plate consisted of dry mashed potatoes (literally just mashed up potatoes) and dry dinner rolls. Can anyone say white carbs?!

Over the years, my vegetarian aunt and I have spent a lot of time trying to convince our meat-and-potatoes family that veg food isn’t gross and boring, and they’ve come a long way. I’m happy to say that my more recent Thanksgivings have been much more satisfying and interesting (and to-date have been Tofurkey-less). There are so many traditional Thanksgiving recipes that already are or can easily be made vegetarian or vegan with a little tweaking, and so many more new ones that should be introduced to everyone’s Thanksgiving table.

Here are some of my favorites:

You’d never guess how well tempeh, acorn squash and pomegranate seeds go together until you try this recipe. And it’s so pretty too!

Sweet potato casserole has always been my favorite Thanksgiving food, thanks to my raging sweet tooth. As much as I love my mom’s recipe, this recipe from Meal Makeover Moms is my new favorite because it’s still flavorful and sweet, but you won’t finish dinner feeling like you already ate dessert!

Thanksgiving and brussels sprouts just go together for me. The toasted breadcrumbs and parmesan make this recipe crowd-pleasing for both brussels sprout lovers and skeptics.

Classic already vegetarian food that everyone will love, and the chive pesto sauce is a delicious, unique addition.

My grandma makes the best stuffing. I was so excited to show up to her house one Thanksgiving to see she had made a separate batch for me with all vegan ingredients. A whole pan of stuffing just for me… what more could a girl want? I got her permission to share the recipe with you all!

P.S. When she sent me the recipe, she noted that she usually doesn’t measure anything, but you can use your discretion on that!

With a lemon tahini dressing, this salad is so refreshing amidst a table full of rich Thanksgiving foods.

While I now float somewhere in-between vegan and vegetarian, I still try to bake vegan whenever I can (especially when it’s so easy!). This recipe is my go-to for pumpkin pie, and no one will have any idea it’s dairy-free.


Roasted Baby Potatoes

They have a delicious, satisfying crunch on the outside while keeping the insides soft and flavorful. This recipe is very simple to make and only uses a few ingredients.

Roasting potatoes is a classic way to make a side dish. Both kids and adults love them!

Roasted Baby Potatoes go well with almost any main dish you&rsquore making, such as Cajun Chicken or Garlic Chive Butter Grilled Steak.


Step 1: Slice the potatoes. Begin by slicing the potatoes in half vertically.

Step 2: Add oil. Next, add the oil to a large skillet and heat it over medium-high. Then, add the salt, along with the potatoes cut side down into the skillet and pan-fry them for 7-8 minutes -- you want them to get nice and crispy.

Step 3: Cook the potatoes. Cover the skillet with a lid, reduce the heat to low and cook the potatoes for 10-12 minutes. You'll know they're done when they're easy to pierce with a fork. Top the potatoes with black pepper and fresh herbs and dig in!


Air Fried Lemon Parmesan Hasselback Fingerling Potatoes

Last week I teamed up with my friends of Idaho Potatoes to introduce you to a really cool device called an Air Fryer. I talked briefly about how awesome this machine is because you can enjoy some of your favorite fried foods with pretty much little to no oil. However that’s not all the machine can do!

Part of my freelance job with Gourmia, who makes this nifty machine, is to develop all kinds of different recipes that work with their air fries.

Yes fries, as in plural. They have the standard model that most people associate when they see an air fryer (and we are giving away!) plus a couple of other models that have the same technology built in. After weeks of working with these machines, I have made everything under the sun. We’re talking about buffalo wings, roast chicken, cheese flautas, spring rolls, molten lava cake(!!) and of course perfectly roasted potatoes.

Honestly, I don’t know what I loved more the cake or the roasted potatoes. It could possibly be a tie.

Pretty shocking to say that I loved potatoes as much as gooey chocolate cake right?

Well, it’s pretty impossible not to love perfectly poppable and incredibly crispy Idaho Potatoes. I can say for sure that the roasted potato is one of my favorite foods in the world and the air fryer does them great justice.

In about 30 minutes, you have potatoes with that crispy crackly skin and fluffy interior. You can easily roast fingerlings whole, they are small enough to do so and cook through fast enough but I do love gussying them up a bit.

It’s safe to say that the hasselback potato makes an impressive statement on the dinner table. All those ridges just give you maximum exposure for extra crispiness and it’s the perfect vessel for holding delicious fillings.

Normally on a full sized russet potato I would fill the slits with thinly sliced garlic. Here, instead the more delicate sliced fingerlings get a gently tossing with lemon zest, a small amount of olive oil and chopped rosemary. Once they are finished cooking they get that final touch of parmesan for the perfect side dish!

For more information on Idaho® Potatoes visit them on Facebook , Twitter, Pinterest and Instagram.

This post is sponsored on behalf of Idaho® Potatoes. As always all opinions are my own and thanks for supporting brands that I work with.


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