au.toflyintheworld.com
New recipes

‘Tide Pod Challenge’: Doctors Warn Parents About Teens Eating Detergent

‘Tide Pod Challenge’: Doctors Warn Parents About Teens Eating Detergent


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


Laundry detergent will never be food

istockphoto.com

This Twitter trend might have gone a little too far.

If you thought the “Cinnamon Challenge” was dangerous, just wait until you read what America’s teens have cooked up next. The “Tide Pod Challenge,” a pointless endeavor that involves physically eating the soap-filled pods, has the internet drooling over containers of laundry detergent.

The idea dawned on people in 2015, when people remarked that Tide Pods looked eerily like a snack. Confused? So were we. Despite the fact that eating these products is actually very dangerous, people continued to fantasize about popping them into their hungry mouths.

More than two years later, the idea is still going strong, despite some angry Twitter users’ protests that this meme should join the graveyard of abandoned internet humor.

Since when has filming yourself eating tide pods a thing? And why have we come to this?!?

— David Bakhtiari (@DBak69) January 6, 2018

And, like many of the internet’s fantasies, it was only a matter of time before people started to give in and actually eat the things. Dozens of teens have captured themselves on camera popping a Tide Pod or two into their mouths, smiling as the soap gushes from tears in the thick plastic casing.

As a preemptive warning, there are a few teens in the following video who actually swallow the Tide Pod. Squeamish viewers beware.

Doctors are calling the situation “life-threatening” and advising anyone who has consumed laundry detergent to call a poison control center.

“You’ll get burns to the skin, burns to the eyes, and a lot of problems that are more severe,” Dr. Joe Krug told WXIN. “Burns to the respiratory tract, burns to the esophagus.”

Worth it for the meme?

To give teens some credit, the creativity coming from this challenge is impressive. Some of these pod-filled meals mirror culinary innovation. For instance, @MoonEmojii created a crispy, baked Tide Pod pizza.

@null111_ arranged a romantic dinner for one.

But come on, guys. Instead of chewing on bitter soap pouches, wouldn’t you rather dig in to one of these romantic dinner dishes?


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Doctors warn parents about dangerous 'Tide Pod Challenge'

A bizarre new trend dubbed the "Tide Pod Challenge" is gaining popularity among teens on social media — and doctors say it could land them in the emergency room.

The challenge involves people popping the small laundry detergent packs and posting videos of themselves chewing and gagging on the oozing product online.

Videos with the title "Tide Pod Challenge" have been shared to YouTube. In some videos, teens are putting the pods in frying pans and cooking them before consuming them.

Memes have erupted all over social media.

Someone even came up with an edible Tide pod recipe.

BREAKING: Someone on Tumblr has come up with an edible tide pod recipe pic.twitter.com/opiIZzgDk4

&mdash Ryan Broderick (@broderick) January 9, 2018

Tide Pods are meant to be used for laundry as an alternative to powder or liquid detergent.

The silly concept of consuming the product first garnered attention in 2015 when the satirical newspaper The Onion published a column about a child who wanted to eat the red and blue detergent pod, which has a candy-like appearance.

Two years later, College Humor shared a video of a man eating an entire bowl of laundry pods and then being carted off into an ambulance. "I don't regret it," he said.

According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, there were more than 10,500 reported exposures to highly concentrated laundry detergent by children age 5 and younger in 2017.

If someone swallows a small amount of the concentrated detergent in the pods, it could result in diarrhea and vomiting. And it can even creep into the lungs and burn the respiratory tract, making it incredibly difficult to breathe, Dr. Alfred Aleguas Jr., managing director of the Florida Poison Information Center told USA Today.

The D.C.-based not-for-profit National Capital Poison Center reported that biting into a pod can cause "serious injury or even death." Rubbing the product into the eyes can make the eyes burn, too.

If a product gets in the eye, rinse immediately with plenty of water for 15 minutes and seek medical advice as needed.

If a product is swallowed, drink a glass of water or milk and contact the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) or doctor immediately. Do not induce vomiting.

Following these laundry safety steps will help keep your home as safe as possible. Know what to do before unintended exposure happens. Read the product safety information provided on the package.”


Watch the video: Ποια έκανε τον καλύτερο Πίνακα Challenge: