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Pork Lo Mein

Pork Lo Mein


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In a large skillet, heat 1/8 cup of the olive oil and 2 tablespoons of the sesame oil over medium-high heat. Season the pork with salt and pepper, to taste, and brown until cooked through, about 15 minutes. (Try not to stir the pork so that it can brown well.) Meanwhile, soak the noodles in scalding hot water until soft, for about 20 minutes. Drain and set aside until ready to use.

When the pork is cooked through and completely browned, remove from the skillet and set aside. Deglaze the pan with the rice wine vinegar, scraping up the brown bits with a spoon as you go. When the vinegar is nearly dissolved, add the rest of the olive oil and sesame oil and heat over medium-high heat. Add the next 6 ingredients and sauté until fragrant and soft, about 10 minutes.

In a bowl, combine the chicken stock, soy sauce, and cornstarch and stir so that it is well combined. Add the chicken stock mixture to the pan with the vegetables and simmer until thickened, about 5 minutes. Add the pork, and stir to incorporate well. Finally, add the noodles. Using tongs, toss the noodles every minute or so until they get a nice char and all of the ingredients are well mixed, about 5 minutes total.


The Best Lo Mein Recipes

When it comes to finding the best lo mein recipe, we know better than anyone that it can be tough to replicate the carton of lo mein that your favorite greasy takeout spot is slinging.

But we’re pretty sure that after years and years of *careful* research and observation on what makes a great lo mein and my dad’s years in my grandparents’ Chinese takeout kitchen, we’ve perfected more than a handful of the best lo mein recipes, AKA America’s favorite noodle (okay, maybe aside from spaghetti…).

I remember growing up, we would get a carton of lo mein at the oddest of times—usually as a “snack.” Late at night after a movie, between errands in the middle of a New Jersey strip mall, and on road trips and vacations when my mom wasn’t content with anything but Chinese food––even the Chinese American takeout variety.

I have a lot of memories of us sitting in a car somewhere random, passing one big takeout carton of beef lo mein back and forth among the four of us like a peace pipe—maybe with a little swipe of chili oil tossed in as my sister and I got older. At about $5 or $6, it couldn’t be beat! Who wants a granola bar when you can have a few bites of lo mein amiright?

We’ve found that today, it’s becoming harder and harder to find a superior Chinese takeout spot, which means lots of disappointing, bland and greasy orders of lo mein. Hence, why we’ve rounded up all the classic lo mein recipes you need, with different variants for you to try when you’re feeling adventurous. From chicken lo mein and beef lo mein to vegetable lo mein, we’ve got you covered with the best lo mein recipes!

In case you’re wondering about the noodles, most of these recipes call for fresh, pre-cooked lo mein noodles—see this picture for the brand we typically use, but you can also check out our ingredients page on Chinese Noodles and Wrappers for more info! If using cooked noodles, you do not have to boil them before using them in your lo mein stir-fry.

If using fresh, uncooked egg noodles, however, you will have to boil them beforehand, drain them, and set them aside before throwing them into your dish:

But you can actually use a range of different Chinese noodles, including fresh white wheat noodles, and we’ve even pulled off some of these recipes with spaghetti in a pinch.

While these recipes will help you achieve the perfect results, we often make lo mein when we have a bunch of veggie odds and ends and small pieces of pork, beef, or chicken, and we want a simple but delicious meal. The overall formula is julienned veggies + sliced protein + noodles. Once you’re familiar with the overall process, feel free to make substitutions and experiment with different combinations of protein and veggies!

Chicken Lo Mein – Restaurant Style

The classic of classics—simple chicken lo mein. It’s like a warm blanket—hearkening back to simpler days of no fuss noodles, and for me, more youthful days parked in a mall somewhere in the middle of New Jersey at the food court, sifting through way too many $1 Claire’s surprise bags.

Shrimp Lo Mein Just Like Chinese Takeout

Our Shrimp Lo Mein recipe has plenty of perfectly cooked shrimp and veggies that we can bet is way better than any shrimp lo mein you’ve ever gotten at a takeout place. It takes a little bit of careful preparation, but you’ll never look back once you’ve tried it.

Vegetable Lo Mein

Vegetable Lo Mein is a great side dish and a much tastier way to get your fill of veggies. Sometimes we even make lo mein that primarily consists of vegetables! It’s a great way to use up the random vegetables that can accumulate in your fridge at the end of the week.

Beef Lo Mein

Our family’s classic, preferred order––big strips of tender beef tossed with perfect soy-sauced noods. It really needs no introduction. ‘Nuff said.

Red Curry Noodles with Chicken

We also love using fresh lo mein noodles for other noodle dishes, and this red curry noodle recipe with chicken is pretty much as easy as opening a can of red curry paste.

Ginger Scallion Hokkien Noodles

Hokkien noodles from the Fujian province are popular in China, but also in Malaysia and Singapore. They’re essentially lo mein egg noodles, and this is our simple take with chicken, and lots of ginger and scallion.

Leftover Thanksgiving Turkey Lo Mein

Okay, so it’s not Thanksgiving—heck, it’s not even fall at the moment—but for anyone who wants to substitute shredded chicken, this is a great recipe to use. Also, perfect if you have leftover roasted turkey or chicken on hand!

Spicy Crispy Pork Noodles (Made with Spaghetti)

This is one of the first recipes we ever posted, but we recently updated it with spaghetti instead of fresh lo mein noodles. The original, while the photos are less than glamorous, is still one of our favorites: Kaitlin’s Special Noodles (Ground Pork Lo Mein). Plus, anyone who’s currently obsessed with Lao Gan Ma chili sauce, this is for you!

If you’re looking for other noodle recipes, head over here!

You may also like…

About Kaitlin

Kaitlin is the younger daughter/sister in The Woks of Life family. Notoriously unable to follow a recipe (usually preferring to freestyle it), Kaitlin's the family artist, knitter, master of all things chili oil/condiments, and trailblazer of creative recipes with familiar flavors.


Cantonese Pan Fried Noodles (Pork Lo Mein)

Cantonese Pan Fried Noodles (Pork Lo Mein) – Our pan-fried noodles AKA pork lo mein recipe is savory, slightly spicy, and packed with flavor. Made with fresh veggies and stir-fried pork, it’s a light and healthy dish that’s easy to make in only 30 minutes!

There is absolutely nothing wrong with that. It’s good to have a few staple meals you can pull together without ever looking at a recipe.

But, c’mon. Sometimes you need a break from the American comfort foods and weekly staples.

Today’s Cantonese Pan Fried Noodles recipe, AKA Pork Lo Mein, is a far cry from traditional (mostly mundane) dinner options. It’s packed with veggies like scallions, carrots, and mung bean sprouts, as well as stir-fried pork loin, and oodles of skinny egg noodles.

Get the Complete (Printable) Cantonese Pan Fried Noodles (Pork Lo Mein) Recipe Below. Enjoy!


Recipe Summary

  • 12 ounces boneless pork loin
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
  • 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • ⅓ cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 3 tablespoons reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 ½ teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • ½ teaspoon Asian chili sauce (Sriracha sauce)
  • 4 ounces dried Chinese egg noodles (lo mein noodles)
  • Nonstick cooking spray
  • 1 cup sliced celery (2 stalks)
  • 1 medium red sweet pepper, seeded and cut into thin bite-size strips
  • 3 cups coarsely shredded bok choy or napa cabbage
  • 1 8 ounce can sliced bamboo shoots, rinsed and drained
  • 6 tablespoons thinly sliced green onions (3)
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame oil

Trim fat from meat. Cut meat into thin bite-size strips. In a medium bowl combine meat, sesame seeds, ginger, and garlic set aside. For sauce, in a small bowl combine broth, soy sauce, vinegar, cornstarch, sugar, and chili sauce set aside. Cook noodles in boiling, lightly salted water according to package directions* drain. Rinse with cold water drain again.

Coat a large skillet or wok with cooking spray heat skillet over medium-high heat. Add celery and sweet pepper cook and stir for 4 minutes. Add bok choy, bamboo shoots, and green onions cook and stir for 2 minutes more. Remove vegetables from skillet.

Add sesame oil to skillet add meat mixture. Cook and stir for 2 to 3 minutes or until meat is slightly pink in center. Push from center of skillet. Stir sauce add to center of skillet. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly. Add cooked noodles and vegetables stir all ingredients together to coat with sauce. Cook and stir about 2 minutes or until heated through.

If there are no directions on the package for cooking the noodles, cook about 4 minutes or until tender but still firm.


  • 2 TBSP oyster sauce
  • 3 TBSP soy sauce
  • 2 TBSP sugar
  • 1 tsp apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1/8 tsp dried ginger
  • dash of white pepper

1. Cook noodles to package instructions. Drain rinse and toss with 1 TBSP oil to prevent sticking. Set aside.

2. Heat a large skillet or wok over high heat. Add 1 TBSP of oil and veggies. Stir until vegetables are nicely seared (about 3 minutes.) Add in the noodles and pour in the sauce. Toss everything together over high heat until well combined. Serve.

NOTE: Add 1 tsp of sesame oil with the veggies for an aromatic flavor. Use peanut oil or canola oil for the stir-fry.


Preparation

Step 1

Bring a medium pot of water to a boil. Add the noodles and cook according to the package instructions until al dente, or the minimum amount of time suggested by the package. Drain the noodles, rinse under cold water, and drain again, shaking well to remove excess water. Return the noodles to the pot, toss with the sesame oil until the noodles are well coated, and set aside.

Prepare the sauce: In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce, oyster sauce, rice wine, and honey. Set aside.

Heat a wok or large skillet over high heat until a bead of water sizzles and evaporates on contact. Add the peanut oil and swirl to coat the bottom. Add the garlic, ginger, and scallions and stir-fry until aromatic, about 30 seconds. Add the mushrooms and cook until softened, 1 to 2 minutes.

Add the noodles and pork. Pour in the sauce mixture and toss with tongs or chopsticks until the noodles and pork are heated through and well coated with sauce. Transfer to a platter and serve.


Ingredients for Pork Lo Mein

  1. Take a large pot of salted water, boil the water.
  2. Cook the linguine in the water until tender for hardly 8-9 minutes and drain.
  3. Meanwhile, combine soy sauce, sesame oil, sugar, cornstarch, and vinegar in a bowl and mix all the ingredients.
  4. Heat oil in a pan, cook snap peas, and onion together in the oil for 2 minutes.
  5. After that, add pork, red bell pepper, ginger, 1 garlic clove, and mushroom, cook it for near about 2 minutes.
  6. Mix the rest of 2 garlic cloves into the mixture and cook it for a maximum of 1 minute.
  7. Add soy sauce mixture into the pork mixture and cook it for 1 minute.
  8. Turn off the flame and add linguine in the pan and mix it to coat a layer on it.

Now, your recipe of Pork Lo Mein is ready. Garnish it with green onions and serve accordingly. I bet that everyone will love it.

Nutritional Facts of Pork Lo Mein

I hope this nutritional breakdown of the Pork Lo Mein that I’ve mentioned below will help you in making balance with your daily food routine.

Calories415
Protein25.6 g
Carbohydrates54.5 g
Sugar7 g
Fat11.3 g
Cholesterol36.7 mg
Calcium59.5 mg
Iron4.3 mg
Magnesium73.6 mg
Potassium761.5 mg
Sodium793.5 mg

How to Make Pork Lo Mein at Home | Video

Watching something live will create an impact on your mind. So, I have added a video of the recipe of Pork Lo Mein that makes your work easy.

I hope you have liked the recipe of Pork Lo Mein. If so, then share your wonderful experience or any recipe of yours in the comments below. I will definitely try to cover it in the upcoming blogs.


Method

Preparation

1. First up, prepare your vegetables. Finely slice the soaked, dehydrated shiitake and your choice of medley of mushrooms so that they are all of similar size, and then place all together in a bowl. (Hint: you can use any mushrooms you have to hand alongside the soaked shiitake. We like a combination of fresh shiitake, oyster and shimeji, but you can use any that are available to you!).

2. Next, finely matchstick your carrot as well as finely slicing the sugar snaps and trimming and washing the beansprouts. Peel both the garlic and ginger, before finely dicing the garlic and matchsticking the ginger. Finally, chop your spring onions into large chunks, about 3cm long, and remove the roots.

3. Time to build your wok clock! On a large plate, place your bowl of mushrooms at 12 o’clock, and then arrange the sliced carrot, sugar snaps, beansprouts, garlic, ginger and spring onion clockwise around the rest of your plate. Leave to one side.

4. Now, move onto your pork. Removing the large fatty sections, slice your pork into small, thin strips and place into a large bowl. Pour ‘The Marinade’ ingredients over the top of the meat and massage the liquid thoroughly into the meat. Leave the bowl to one side.

5. Lastly, make up your sauce. In a small bowl, combine ‘The Sauce’ ingredients and leave to the side. Remove your fresh egg noodles from their packet and lightly toss in oil, then also leave on a separate plate. You’re ready to wok!

6. Bring your wok to a high heat and add a small amount of vegetable oil, swirling the oil around the pan until it reaches smoking point. Pour in the bowl of mushrooms, pushing in with the back of your ladle to allow them to sear, before folding them through. Repeat the process of searing and folding for approximately 3 minutes, until the mushrooms are cooked but slightly charred. Stir in a pinch of salt and then transfer to a large bowl to one side.

7. Bring another teaspoon of oil to its smoking point over a high heat, then add your harder vegetables of carrots and sugar snap peas. Stir fry for just 1 minute before pushing them to the side of the wok and adding the bean sprouts into the gap. Allow the beansprouts to sit and sear for a few seconds before folding them through the vegetable mixture and stir frying for a further minute. Remove the contents of the wok into the same bowl as the mushrooms and leave to the side.

8. Return your empty wok to a high heat, and once again bring a drizzle of oil to its smoking point. Add the slices of pork, pushing into the meat with the back of your ladle to sear before stir frying until the meat is cooked. Now, push your meat to the side of the wok, adding the garlic, ginger and spring onion into the gap along with another drizzle of oil if your wok is dry. Bring the pork over the top of the vegetables, and allow the mixture to sear for 20-30 seconds.

9. With the wok still smoking hot, pour in your sauce and bring it to the boil. Add your cornflour paste one teaspoon at a time, adjusting until your sauce reaches a silky consistency. Finally add your noodles, moving them so they are all well-coated in sauce, before placing your pre-cooked vegetables back over the top. Leave for approximately 2 minutes, ensuring that the noodles do not catch or burn, and then serve. Enjoy!

How To Make Pork Lo Mein

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Utensils

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Classes

  • 175g pork fillet
  • 225g fresh egg noodles
  • 1 carrot
  • 100g soaked dehydrated shiitake mushrooms
  • 100g mixed wild mushrooms (or medley of fresh shiitake, oyster & shimeji)
  • 10 sugar snap peas
  • 200g beansprouts, trimmed
  • 2 spring onions
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 thumb-sized piece of fresh ginger
  • Approx. 3 tsps corn flour paste (made up of 50:50 cornflour to water)

The Marinade

  • 1 ½ tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 tbsp light soy sauce
  • Pinch of white pepper
  • 125ml fresh chicken stock

Preparation

1. First up, prepare your vegetables. Finely slice the soaked, dehydrated shiitake and your choice of medley of mushrooms so that they are all of similar size, and then place all together in a bowl. (Hint: you can use any mushrooms you have to hand alongside the soaked shiitake. We like a combination of fresh shiitake, oyster and shimeji, but you can use any that are available to you!).

2. Next, finely matchstick your carrot as well as finely slicing the sugar snaps and trimming and washing the beansprouts. Peel both the garlic and ginger, before finely dicing the garlic and matchsticking the ginger. Finally, chop your spring onions into large chunks, about 3cm long, and remove the roots.

3. Time to build your wok clock! On a large plate, place your bowl of mushrooms at 12 o’clock, and then arrange the sliced carrot, sugar snaps, beansprouts, garlic, ginger and spring onion clockwise around the rest of your plate. Leave to one side.

4. Now, move onto your pork. Removing the large fatty sections, slice your pork into small, thin strips and place into a large bowl. Pour ‘The Marinade’ ingredients over the top of the meat and massage the liquid thoroughly into the meat. Leave the bowl to one side.

5. Lastly, make up your sauce. In a small bowl, combine ‘The Sauce’ ingredients and leave to the side. Remove your fresh egg noodles from their packet and lightly toss in oil, then also leave on a separate plate. You’re ready to wok!

6. Bring your wok to a high heat and add a small amount of vegetable oil, swirling the oil around the pan until it reaches smoking point. Pour in the bowl of mushrooms, pushing in with the back of your ladle to allow them to sear, before folding them through. Repeat the process of searing and folding for approximately 3 minutes, until the mushrooms are cooked but slightly charred. Stir in a pinch of salt and then transfer to a large bowl to one side.

7. Bring another teaspoon of oil to its smoking point over a high heat, then add your harder vegetables of carrots and sugar snap peas. Stir fry for just 1 minute before pushing them to the side of the wok and adding the bean sprouts into the gap. Allow the beansprouts to sit and sear for a few seconds before folding them through the vegetable mixture and stir frying for a further minute. Remove the contents of the wok into the same bowl as the mushrooms and leave to the side.

8. Return your empty wok to a high heat, and once again bring a drizzle of oil to its smoking point. Add the slices of pork, pushing into the meat with the back of your ladle to sear before stir frying until the meat is cooked. Now, push your meat to the side of the wok, adding the garlic, ginger and spring onion into the gap along with another drizzle of oil if your wok is dry. Bring the pork over the top of the vegetables, and allow the mixture to sear for 20-30 seconds.

9. With the wok still smoking hot, pour in your sauce and bring it to the boil. Add your cornflour paste one teaspoon at a time, adjusting until your sauce reaches a silky consistency. Finally add your noodles, moving them so they are all well-coated in sauce, before placing your pre-cooked vegetables back over the top. Leave for approximately 2 minutes, ensuring that the noodles do not catch or burn, and then serve. Enjoy!

How To Make Pork Lo Mein

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Have you been inspired by our tips and recipes? Why not check out our ranges below! From our exclusive range of woks to our cookery classes that will help inspire your cooking further.


  • 8 ounces whole-wheat spaghetti
  • ⅓ cup reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 2 tablespoons canola oil
  • 2 cups snap peas, trimmed
  • 12 ounces boneless pork loin chops or tenderloin, trimmed, cut into thin strips
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3-4 scallions, sliced

Cook pasta in a large pot of boiling water until just tender, 8 to 10 minutes or according to package directions. Drain.

Combine soy sauce, rice vinegar, cornstarch and sugar in a small bowl.

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add snap peas and cook, stirring frequently, until beginning to soften, about 2 minutes. Add pork and cook, stirring, until no longer pink on the outside, about 2 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir the soy sauce mixture, pour into the pan and cook, stirring, until thickened, 30 seconds to 1 minute. Remove from the heat. Add the pasta to the pan and toss to coat with the sauce. Serve topped with scallions.


Mapo Pork Lo Mein

Recipe adapted from Paul Donnelly, Chinese Tuxedo, New York, NY

Yield: 4 servings

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 35 minutes

Ingredients

For the Pork Marinade:

1½ tablespoons granulated sugar

1 tablespoon Maggi seasoning, or soy sauce

For the Mapo Lo Mein:

1 Fresno chile&mdashstemmed, seeded and minced

One 1-inch piece ginger, peeled and minced

3 tablespoons soybean oil

1½ cups chicken stock, divided

1 pound fresh lo mein noodles

Directions

1. Marinate the pork: In a medium bowl, combine all of the pork marinade ingredients and mix thoroughly to combine.

2. Make the mapo lo mein: In a mini food processor, chop the garlic, chile and ginger into a fine paste. In a medium saucepan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the garlic paste and fry until fragrant, 1 minute. Add the chili bean paste and sweet bean sauce to the pan and cook, stirring often, until the oil in the mixture begins to split, 2 to 3 minutes.

3. Add the marinaded pork to the pan and cook, breaking apart the mixture with a wooden spoon, until the meat begins to caramelize, 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in all but 1 tablespoon of the chicken stock, scraping up any fond that forms on the bottom of the pan. Bring to a boil, then stir in the Spicy Chili Crisp.

4. In a separate bowl, combine the remaining tablespoon of stock with the cornstarch and mix until smooth. Add to the pot, making sure that the liquid is boiling, and stir until slightly thickened, 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and keep warm.

5. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the lo mein noodles and cook until tender, 4 minutes. Strain the noodles and divide between plates. Spoon the pork mixture over the noodles, then serve.