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The Daily Dish: France Institutes Ban on Plastic Cups, Plates, and Utensils

The Daily Dish: France Institutes Ban on Plastic Cups, Plates, and Utensils


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France Institutes Ban on Plastic Cups, Plates, and Utensils

France has passed a law banning “plastic crockery and cutlery… unless it is made from biologically-sourced materials,” The Telegraph reported. Though environmental organizations are in favor of the ban, others argue the new law violates European Union rules on “free movement of goods,” Independent reported. Pack2Go Europe, an organization that represents European packaging manufacturers, is fighting against the law. Eamonn Bates, Pack2Go Europe’s secretary general, said there was no proof that biologically sourced materials are any more eco-friendly, and is concerned that people might take the use of biodegradable materials as permission to be more lax about littering.

Minnesota Restaurateur Defends ‘Muslims Get Out’ Sign in Front of Restaurant

In the aftermath of a horrific terrorist attack at a mall in St. Cloud, Minnesota, indications of anti-Muslim sentiment have appeared around the state. Most notably, at the Treats Family Restaurant in Lonsdale, a sign appeared in front of the restaurant that read, “Muslims Get Out.” A second line read, “In support of St. Cloud.” Owner Dan Ruedinger told CBS that he defends placing it in the window: “It’s time that people started…not worrying about the PC crowd...I feel what we’re doing is right. We are not targeting the Muslims in general, just the extremists.” Since the sign appeared, large groups have gathered outside to protest. “People are going to…think Lonsdale as a whole, as a community, is as crass as that sign,” protestor Peyton Estepp told CBS. The owner of the restaurant said he had no plans to remove the sign.

10,000 Cases of Eggo Waffles Recalled for Listeria Concerns

Kellogg’s has recalled approximately 10,000 cases of Eggo Nutri-Grain whole-wheat waffles for potential listeria contamination, according to a release. No illnesses related to the product have been reported, and the recall is a result of routine tests that “identified the potential for contamination.” The recalled waffles come in 10-count packs and have “best by” dates of Nov. 21 and 22, 2017. Kellogg’s is asking customers who purchased the affected product to discard it immediately and contact the company for a full refund.

McDonald’s Expands All-Day Breakfast Offerings Beginning Today

McGriddle dreams are coming true as McDonald’s launches its expanded offerings for all-day breakfast nationwide. After a successful test in January in response to customer demand, McGriddles have finally made it to the all-day breakfast menu, which includes hash browns, hotcakes, McMuffins, and many other popular items.

Danny Meyer to Open a Seasonal Restaurant and Catering Service in Bryant Park

Danny Meyer is set to open a seasonal restaurant in Manhattan’s Bryant Park, called Public Fare. Located next to the ice skating rink, it will operate from late October through early March and will be part of Bryant Park’s Winter Village, according to Grub Street. The restaurant will seat 210 people and serve breakfast, lunch, and dinner, with a menu consisting of sandwiches, salads, pastries, wine, coffee, and cocktails. Chef John Karangis will be in charge of the menu, and projected prices for lunch are under $20 and $30 for dinner.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


How To Make A Perfect Bouillabaisse At Home

Easily among the most recognizable and highly regarded dishes to come from the Provençal region of southern France is bouillabaisse, a rich seafood stew packed with fresh seafood and seasoned with bold aromatics like anise, fennel, and saffron. Bouillabaisse makes an appropriate feast for the summer season, since it originally hailed from the port city of Marseille, a Mediterranean town with gentle temperatures all year long. But as a hot, hearty dish with deeply developed flavor complexity, bouillabaisse can have a life far beyond the warmer months of the year. In fact, it’s an ideal transitional meal to easily guide you from summer to fall. If you’re ready to give this French staple a try, read on for some expert advice and a recipe to get you started.

Be sure to purchase fresh, high-quality seafood

Seafood serves as the most crucial element of a bouillabaisse it’s not only the stew’s source of protein, but its flavor permeates every aspect of the dish, and all other ingredients exist to highlight and emphasize the seafood. For that reason, you’ll want to seek out the best fish and shellfish that you can find.

“Like many other European style fish stews such as cioppino and bacalao, bouillabaisse always tastes better with higher-quality ingredients, spices, and herbs. However, unlike a bacalao, which uses salt-preserved cod, bouillabaisse is still best with the freshest seafood possible,” head chef/owner/recipe developer Jessica Randhawa of The Forked Spoon offers by way of context.

Chef and cookbook author Amy Riolo agrees, adding that it’s completely fine to experiment with seafood ingredients, as long as they’re fresh. “Don’t worry about what seafood the recipe calls for [just] use the freshest combination that you can get, the way that a fisherman would make this recipe with what they have on hand,” she insists.

A rich, flavorful fish stock should be your number one bouillabaisse priority

Fresh fish and shellfish make up the textural elements of a great bouillabaisse, but even the best versions of these items won’t save you if your broth lacks vibrant and well-balanced flavor. For that reason, chef/restaurateur Ken Irvine of Irvine Hospitality Group in San Diego, California urges you to remember that “the secret to good bouillabaisse is the base, the stock. Lobster shells are the best [for infusing the stock with flavor], white fish bones would be a good substitute, and shrimp shells are my least favorite. A combo of all three would be ideal. In a stock pot, brown the shells or bones in butter until the color pops add garlic, shallots and make them sweat a bit. Add water and mirepoix (carrots, onions, celery), thyme stems and peppercorns. Simmer for about a half hour.”

Make sure to stagger your timing when adding the seafood to the broth

Slow-cooked stews like bouillabaisse sometimes feel like dangerous endeavors, because it can be deceptively easy to overcook the protein. In order to avoid this grievous fate, Frank Proto, the director of culinary operations for the Institute of Culinary Education , advises the following: “When you’re cooking a bouillabaisse, make sure to stagger when you add the seafood. You want to add the seafood that requires longer cooking earlier than any seafood that cooks quickly.”

Don’t skimp on pastis

Traditional bouillabaisse recipes include a healthy glug of pastis, a French apéritif spirit with a distinct anise flavor. Different versions of the dish will involve different quantities of pastis…but chef/owner Rob Shaner of Robert et Fils in Chicago, Illinois endorses a “more is more” approach. “I think the pastis pour [in a bouillabaisse] should be very heavy” is Shaner’s unambiguous recommendation.

If you can’t find saffron, swap in turmeric

The floral, slightly grassy flavor of saffron is a signature element of Provençal bouillabaisse, but its very high price and its scarcity at many U.S. grocery stores can make it a tough item to acquire. If you find yourself saffron-less while craving bouillabaisse, try this substitute suggested by Chef Chris Mentzer of Rastelli’s in Swedesboro, New Jersey: “ Saffron is one of the main distinctions for this dish. It gives the broth that distinct yellow color and profound flavor like no other. However, if you’re on a budget or you can’t find it…a ½ teaspoon of turmeric does the same as a pinch of saffron!”

WhiteYura/Shutterstock

Top your bouillabaisse with rouille for an added boost of flavor

Like many other rich soups and stews, bouillabaisse can benefit from a nice kick of heat, and when it’s served in Provence, said heat usually comes in the form of a condiment known as rouille. “ Rouille is the French word for ‘rust’, and [it’s also] the name of a spicy, hot, rust-colored paste made from red pepper, chili pepper, garlic, extra virgin olive oil, and breadcrumbs, which is stirred into the soup just before eating,” Amy Riolo explains.


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