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Baking Soda: Not Just for Baking

Baking Soda: Not Just for Baking


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  • Substitute it for tums when you have a stomachache
  • Remove laundry stains
  • Rub on teeth for a cheap whitening strategy
  • Use as an effective, and less expensive, deodorant
  • Try it in a homemade face scrub
  • Or even after a tough day as a homemade bath soak
  • Toss is in with your load of laundry for cleaner towels
  • Or in the next load to freshen your sheets

Photo by Norah Cliff

  • Try baking soda in a concoction to clean the interior of your car
  • Use it as a hand cleanser and forget about the pungent alcohol smell of hand sanitizer
  • Instead of harsh soap that can leave a residue, clean pots and plastic containers with baking soda
  • Try it to deodorize the garbage can
  • Use it to freshen up and clean sponges
  • Neutralize the popcorn smell in the microwave
  • Freshen up your stinky gym bag that steams up when you leave it in the car
  • Use on stains made by pets
  • Apply to burns when ice, cool water or vinegar doesn’t do the trick

By: Norah Cliff

For details and more fun ways to use baking soda check out this link. You can also find Arm and Hammer products that have gained popularity including: toothpaste and laundry detergent. Don’t knock mom! She usually has a method to her madness.

Check out these related articles:

  • Forty Uses for Vinegar
  • When “Caution Hot” Isn’t Enough: Burn First Aid
  • Kitchen Tools for the Broke

View the original post, Baking Soda: Not Just for Baking, on Spoon University.

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  • Ultimate Chipotle Menu Hacks
  • Copycat Chick-Fil-A sandwich recipe
  • The Science Behind Food Cravings
  • How to Make Your Own Almond Flour

Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


Baking Soda and Baking Powder: Why Use Both?

We’ve always wondered why some recipes called for both baking soda and baking powder. They’re both chemical leaveners that do pretty much the same thing in pretty much the same way. So is it just extra insurance? We finally found our answer in this month’s issue of Fine Cooking!

Food Geek Brian Geiger explains that it all comes down to acid. Baking soda needs some in order to activate and create the carbon dioxide needed to lift the batter, and you want to use only enough soda to neutralize the acid (since leftover soda in the batter tastes gross). Baking powder is actually baking soda mixed with just the right balance of another acidic ingredient, so you don’t have to worry about acid in your recipe or leftover soda in your batter!

Now the reason why both soda and powder might be used is because you might have enough soda to neutralize the acid in a recipe, but not actually enough to lift the batter. In these cases, Geiger says that a little baking powder will give the extra lift needed to make the recipe perfect. You could use baking powder alone, but then your finished baked treat might taste too acidic.

Geiger says that you might also use both soda and powder when you want the recipe to taste a little tangy or develop a nice browned color. Baking soda is the key to both of these!


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Comments:

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  5. Stirling

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