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The Daily Dish: August 1, 2016

The Daily Dish: August 1, 2016


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Dishing out the latest and greatest in food news

Learn more about what is hot and trending in the world of food and drink

Today’s first course?

It’s truly an end to an era. The contents of the iconic Four Seasons restaurant were auctioned off for an impressive $4.1 million, far exceeding the presale estimate of $1.33 million, The New York Times reported. The nearly 15-hour auction took place Tuesday in the Pool Room. Furniture, signage, flatware, cutlery, and other pieces were up for the taking. But at the last minute, the restaurant’s owners Alex von Bidder and Julian Niccolini withdrew a number of items from the auction to donate to the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a Four Seasons period room.

Forrest E. Mars Jr., grandson of the founder of Mars, Inc., passed away in Seattle on Tuesday, at age 84. During his tenure as co-president, Mars, Inc. became the world’s largest confectionary company, selling everything from Mars bars to Uncle Ben’s rice. Forrest Jr. inherited the company along with his brother John and sister Jacqueline in 1973 from their father, Forrest Sr., who was responsible for inventing M&M’s, the most famous Mars product today. is survived by his wife, four daughters, 11 grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

It looks like France will be getting nude with the food. The naked pop-up restaurant that gained such notoriety in London is closing a month early to open in Paris. The French version of The Bunyadi — where participants dine in the buff — will close in London July 30 and pop up in Paris this September. Although the menu and drinks will be different to appeal to a French aesthetic, the concept will remain the same. Diners will step behind screens to undress and are given a robe and slippers. It is then up to the customers whether to totally disrobe. It’s an odd concept, to say the least, but this buff gimmick has apparently piqued Londoners’ interests. The waiting list right now for the London café has thousands of names on it, and the owner expects similar buzz for the second location.

That’s today’s daily dish, thanks for watching. Stop by tomorrow for another helping.


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Pasta ‘ncasciata: Montalbano’s favourite

This post was inspired by my fellow blogger Vanessa who has a site I enjoy very much called Food in Books. It deals with the two things I love more than anything else: eating and reading. Vanessa scours the world&rsquos literature looking for references to food and then she develops a recipe based on the one in the extract, so you can eat along with your favourite literary characters.

Vanessa already has a couple of Italian recipes based on The Godfather by Mario Puzo and The Name of the Rose by the recently deceased Umberto Eco&mdashwhich also happens to be one of my favourite books. Vanessa was kind enough to reference my blog in the post on The Name of the Rose, so I thought I&rsquod return the compliment by doing my own Food in Books post, based on the Montalbano novels by Andrea Camilleri.

Since his first appearance in La forma dell&rsquoacqua (The Shape of Water) in 1994, Commissario Montalbano, a Sicilian police inspector with his own way of doing things, has become a major character in Italian literature. In 1999, the Italian state TV company, RAI, started making the books into TV films which have had an enormous success both in and outside Italy.

In the second Montalbano novel, Il cane di terracotta (The Terracotta Dog), we discover Salvo Montalbano&rsquos favourite dish. During a particularly difficult investigation, Montalbano goes home and has a long swim in the sea outside his house. Going back inside he feels hungry and finds in the oven &lsquoa dish containing four enormous portions of pasta &lsquoncasciata, a dish worthy of the gods of Mount Olympus.&rsquo (Camilleri, A (1996) Il cane di terracotta Palermo: Sellerio.) We are told that he ate two portions and then went to bed and slept for an hour like lead.

The dish had been left for him by his cleaning lady Adelina and her food turns up often in the novels. In a recent TV dramatisation of Una faccenda delicata Montalbano asks secretly Adelina to prepare pasta &lsquoncasciata for him because he can&rsquot face the cooking of his long term girlfriend Livia, during one of her frequent visits from Genoa.

Pasta &lsquoncasciata is essentially what in the UK we&rsquod call a pasta bake: pasta, with a tomato sauce, aubergine, cheese&mdashlots of cheese&mdashall baked in the oven. I can hear your mouths watering so without further ado here is the recipe. I&rsquoll warn you though: like all Italian dishes every mamma has her own variation. Buon appetito!


Watch the video: The Daily Dash: August 1, 2016 New Month, New Mission