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Meet Chef Chris

Meet Chef Chris


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By Carly DeFilippo

3 stars in the New York Times. Your ICE Chef Instructor.

From the Beatles to Lucille Ball, Charlie Chaplin to Oprah Winfrey—some of the greatest success stories come from unlikely candidates who were told they would never “make it.” But if ICE instructor Chef Chris Gesualdi was once an underdog, you’d never know it today.

Even as a young culinary student, it was clear that Chef Chris' work ethic made him distinct from other cooks. His first step into the "big leagues" of cooking was volunteering in Chef Thomas Keller's kitchen at La Reserve (while sustaining another full-time job). Chris quickly became Keller's "right hand man" and sous chef, working alongside the celebrated chef for 7 years.

"The years I worked at La Reserve, Raphael's and Rakel were some of the most formidable of my career and Chris was there every day. His commitment, dedication and work ethic were unmatched and continue to be an example today. I am blessed to be able to call him a colleague and friend, and our profession is in a better place because of chefs like Chris who truly understand what it takes to be a chef.” - Thomas Keller


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Miami Chef Chris Valdes’ new cookbook features recipes and family stories

Support the independent voice of Miami and help keep the future of the New Times free.

Four years ago, Miami Chef Chris Valdes had never dreamed that he would star in Food Network Star or compete with Chopped. Nor did he see himself writing his own cookbook, telling memories of a childhood he and his stepmother spent in the kitchen.

But that’s exactly where he is today – and that’s partly thanks to a bad breakup.

“I was in a deep depression. It was something I had never been through and I knew I had to do something that would help distract my mind,” Valdes tells the New Times. “I went to Paris, London, Rome, New Orleans, San Francisco – and none of them did the trick. So one day I woke up and said, ‘I’m going to work on my childhood dream.’ I always knew I was going to be a chef, but I never knew that I would get so much love and support from everywhere. “

Valdes has been a popular culinary talent ever since. At a young age, he received a $ 10,000 scholarship to Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. At the age of 19 he opened Chris Valdes Catering. A decade later, the business continues to thrive, a success that has allowed him to work with numerous American brands and airlines to Royal Caribbean.

Valdes has been featured in countless publications in South Florida and was a finalist on Season 14 of Food Network Star. (Next month, the chef will also appear as a contestant on Season 50 of Food Network’s Chopped.)

But life has not always been easy for this talented young chef. His father was imprisoned for almost two decades. During this time, Valdes’ family lost their home and restaurant business. However, these adversities sparked his desire to make something of himself.

Valdes tells the New Times that he started cooking as a child, mostly as his stepmother’s sous chef. It quickly became a popular pastime and saw its culinary inspiration, Emeril Lagasse, on TV.

Frita Slider and Arroz con Pollo from Chris Valdes’ Miami cookbook One With the Kitchen.

Photo of JC through the lens

These days, however, Valdes is the other side of the camera lens – perhaps best known for his soul-searching-inspired YouTube channel Cooking With Chris, where he shares his recipe tips and tutorials with thousands of followers.

“For years people have asked me where to buy my cookbook – and then I realized it was time to actually write one,” said Valdes. “I wanted to do something more than just an ordinary cookbook. I wanted to talk about my story and how I got where I am. I wanted to share childhood stories and embarrassing stories and learn about the person behind the cook.”

To that end, One With the Kitchen ($ 30) shares Valdes’ experience as a young entrepreneur who was inspired by his stepmother’s kitchen. These memories, combined with the triumphs and difficulties of working in the industry at a young age, helped make him a chef and TV personality.

Valdes gave the book a distinct 90s vibe and offered readers a mix of “old school Latin American recipes with a modern twist”. The autobiographical work includes 70 of his most popular recipes, from a Cuban steak sandwich with pickled jalapeños and caramelized onions to chili shrimp with pico de gallo and feta cheese.

A favorite recipe is his stepmother’s boliche, a Cuban-style pot roast his mother would make to celebrate his birthday. The dish starts with citrus marinated beef stuffed with chorizo ​​and olives before being tied and slowly cooked.

“Growing up, I would see her put hours into creating it, with great taste and love,” says Valdes. “I still like to watch her do it, and I still ask her how to cook it, even though I know how – just to keep the kid in the house and remember the old days, in who started this love in the kitchen. “

Keep The Miami New Times Free … Since we started the Miami New Times, it has been defined as the free, independent voice of Miami, and we want it to stay that way. We offer our readers free access to concise coverage of local news, food and culture. Produce stories on everything from political scandals to the hottest new bands with bold reporting, stylish writing, and staff everything from the Society of Professional Journalists’ Sigma Delta Chi Feature Writing Award to the Casey Medal for the Deservable Journalism have won. Given that the existence of local journalism amid siege and setbacks has a greater impact on advertising revenue, it is more important than ever for us to raise support to fund our local journalism. You can help by joining our I Support membership program which allows us to continue to cover Miami without paywalls.

Nicole Danna is a Palm Beach County-based reporter who has been reporting on the South Florida food scene for the New Times since 2011. She also enjoys drinking beer and writing about the growing craft beer community in the region.


Watch the video: Burak Özdemir Turkish Chef Cooking Amazing Traditional Turkish Food 2019


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