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Sushi Comes Back to Life and Waves at Hungry Diner in Japan

Sushi Comes Back to Life and Waves at Hungry Diner in Japan


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Dreamstime

Sushi served to a diner in the city of Kishiwada in Southern Japan’s Osaka Prefecture was served nigiri so fresh that it waved.

Twitter user @shoumizo3446 was able to capture a video of his piece of sushi from popular Japanese chain Sushiro as it waved and wiggled at him on his plate. He quickly shared it to social media where it quickly went viral.

According to U.K. paper The Sun, the diner ordered an item called “iki hokkigai,” which is typically prepared on the premises with seafood that is delivered to the restaurant alive.

The stomach-turning video has so far received over 111,000 likes and over 51,800 responses. Twitter users are both disgusted and fascinated by the possible zombie-sushi.

Mashable consulted a marine biologist to see if the sushi, which turned out to be clam, was actually still alive. They spoke with marine biologist Callum Roberts who said, "Clams have very simple nervous systems, and rather than a brain have three sets of paired ganglia distributed through the body, which coordinate the activities of the animal," he said. "Clearly, in this case, some of these are still intact and functional."

So basically, the clam is still alive! The diner responded in the comments of the tweets that he ate the sushi and that it was “extremely delicious.” Never heard of iki hokkigai? It’s served in some of the world’s best sushi restaurants.


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?


Let's Meet the Meat

There is a curious phenomenon in commercials in which edible animals or the post-prepared food and drink is given intelligence and the power of speech. And it wants humans to eat it. Or at least, others of its kind.

The title comes from the Dish of the Day sequence in Douglas Adams' The Restaurant at the End of the Universe. At the Restaurant, Arthur Dent is horrified to discover that the Dish of the Day is an intelligent herbivore bred to find fulfillment in being consumed. The cruelty, the Dish of the Day explains, lies not in eating animals, but in eating animals or plants who don't want to be eaten. Ironically, several science-fiction works written since have played this idea straight, often crossed with I'm a Humanitarian for maximum Nightmare Fuel.

There is, naturally, a great deal of cross-over with Carnivore Confusion. May also overlap with Fridge Horror, and more often than not with Cargo Envy. Can be horrifying, sick or somewhat funny depending on the person. Can sometimes be justified by using fruit, which quite logically should want to be eaten so that the seeds will be spread.

Comes in a few variations:

  • Eat Me: An animal or food product is advertising itself as food. Shown in the page image.
  • Cannibalism: An animal or food product is shown eating others of its own kind, and advertising them as food.
  • Eat Mor Chikin: A variation of this trope, where some other animal or food is trying to get you to eat the food advertised, presumably so you don't eat it.
  • I Want to Live!: An animal or food doesn't want to be eaten, and is running from you, its predator. Usually played for Black Comedy.
  • Why Don't You Want Me?: An inferior food product wants to be eaten, but can't, because it's not as good as the product being advertised.
  • Parodies, Black Comedy and other variations

Compare Black Comedy Cannibalism, Meat-O-Vision, and Stewed Alive. Contrast You Won't Like How I Taste where the edible person doesn't want to be eaten. Contains aspects of Tools of Sapience.

If the animal starts having second thoughts, does that mean it's having a Meal Realization?